Comments on: A Doll’s House http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/ Sun, 13 Jan 2019 12:02:38 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.22 By: Антон Изм http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-375047 Sat, 09 Apr 2016 03:53:28 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-375047 Все Ваши клиенты и партнеры для Вашего бизнеса уже есть в наличии!!!

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By: Sean http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4735 Tue, 13 Jul 2010 01:24:56 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4735 Maria, even the Ivies have remedial writing courses—when I started college, you were encouraged to take what was euphemistically called an “interdisciplinary freshman writing seminar,” the real purpose of which was clearly to flush out the entering students who’d never been so much as taught how to write a five-paragraph expository essay.

Denel, everyone I know who teaches at the college level says similar things. (BTW, when Denel says “our experience,” she means it. She and I went all through high school together.) I don’t know that I ever really minded the huge lectures in and of themselves; if the professor actually knew how to teach, and the TA leading the recitation section spoke English, it seemed like a good balance. When one or both of those didn’t obtain, you were in trouble unless the textbook was exceptionally clear.

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By: Denel http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4710 Thu, 08 Jul 2010 16:25:42 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4710 Just had to add my thoughts to the June 18th comment: as a professor at a community college, I find it endlessly frustrating that I’m forced to teach “down” to the level of the class in the sense that there are so many students there that don’t want to be there or don’t belong there (or sometimes, and to their credit, they work full time to pay for being there… but then don’t have time to study)… I feel badly for the students that are there to learn and actually do the work, I’m just not able to give them what they deserve because I’m too busy teaching the rest of the class how to do basic math or write a paper… guess they didn’t have the benefit of our experience in AP English 😉

The up side is that my biggest class is 30 students, I know all of their names and probably a good deal more about their lives… not at all like my freshmen classes in the Ivy league where we were in a lecture hall with 300 others trying to learn calculus.

In the end, I’m encouraging my daughters to be hairstylists or plumbers 😉

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By: Janis Gore http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4663 Mon, 28 Jun 2010 06:52:45 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4663 Now, bypassing others’ marital problems, I do accept “crazed sex poodle” into my personal vocabulary. Don’t quite know where to use it.

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By: Maria http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4624 Sat, 19 Jun 2010 15:19:58 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4624 What’s really scary, Sean, is the four-year state schools that are feeling compelled to offer remedial courses because so many of their students are coming into college not truly prepared and ready to do college-level work. Moorhead State offered those types of courses even back in the late 80’s when I attended there. I know that currently the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus also offers remedial courses…

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By: Sean http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4619 Sat, 19 Jun 2010 00:55:08 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4619 Leslie:
“As for school districts cheating on tests, I do not agree with that kind of thing, of course, but I’m not really surprised by it because my experience has led me to believe that it’s not the schools per se that are the underlying cause of poor test scores (at least not where I live in Durham, NC, a district filled with Title I kids). It’s the populations they serve.”

I do agree with that, actually. I have no doubt that it’s frustrating to teach kids whose parents are not doing any child-rearing. Even thirty years ago, when I was going through my high-achieving, comfy suburban school district, teachers frequently told me how lucky I was that my parents were so involved. (I think they also liked that my parents trusted the teachers’ judgment, but that was hardly going to be worth pointing out to me.) Under normal circumstances, teachers really can’t do all they’re asked to do in many schools. My issue is with mounting a defense of unambiguous fraud based on the damage low performance does to teachers’ self-esteem.

Thanks, Rondi!

Julie:
“All that is just to say that I think we push too many people to go to college, convince them that it’s the only way they’re ever going to get a good job. It’s really not true. There are so many other ways to make a life for oneself, and many of them don’t cost nearly so much, although many of them also require you to grow up faster than college does.”

I think wanting a buffer zone between high school and real adulthood is a big factor for a lot of people, actually: you can delay supporting yourself while feeling that you’re making an investment in your earning potential.

But the major problem, as you note, is the idea that everyone has to go to college or risk working at McDonald’s for life. Defining college so expansively means it’s necessarily watered down. One side effect is that community colleges, which should be able to serve the needs of people in the situation you describe, have little to offer people who are ready to perform at college level but lack funds. They (the community colleges, I mean) are too busy delivering thinly disguised remedial courses to address deficits in high school education.

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By: Julie http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4618 Fri, 18 Jun 2010 20:27:37 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4618 I’m also glad you’re back!

I have no comment on the Gores. Really. No comment at all.

About the student loan issue, though…I went a state school, and I think it was fine. I went in with a very specific plan about what I wanted to do, one that wouldn’t have made paying off student loans eventually very troublesome. But, even at a state school, for me, there was no other way to go to college except get heavily in debt, so the options were pretty much only: Go to college now and take on however much debt it takes, or not go to college. The military was, unfortunately, not an option because of my, um, checkered past. I suppose I could have worked for some amount of time and paid for it without going into debt, but working as a waitress, I suspect it would have taken a very long time to amass that kind of savings. I’m good at academics, so everyone including me just assumed college was what I should do, and then I’d get a good job and so the debt didn’t seem to matter.

I am not *only* good at academics, though, and now, looking back, I wish someone had told me to just take the years of waiting tables and put off the years studying linguistics because my degrees no longer have any meaning or relevance to my life, yet the debt remains. I don’t regret it, exactly, but I wish I had had the kids first and then gone to school when the kids got older. Of course, without the degree, I wouldn’t have gone to Japan to meet my fabulous husband, and besides, when I was 18, he was only…ah…12…good lord. So, I guess the money was just buying me some time until he got to a respectable age.

All that is just to say that I think we push too many people to go to college, convince them that it’s the only way they’re ever going to get a good job. It’s really not true. There are so many other ways to make a life for oneself, and many of them don’t cost nearly so much, although many of them also require you to grow up faster than college does.

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By: Rondi http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4614 Thu, 17 Jun 2010 21:50:43 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4614 1) I too thank the elements every day for the Supreme Court decision making Bush president.
2) Glad you are back!

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By: Maria http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4613 Thu, 17 Jun 2010 20:44:13 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4613 I would say technical writing in Japanese is definitely a form of expertise. 😉

I agree, Leslie, that family involvement and expectations are a very important factor in the formula for success. As a graduate student working to become licensed in Special Ed, I know first-hand that it is way too easy for human beings to conceive. But, it will be job security for me…

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By: Leslie http://whiteperil.com/2010/06/14/a-dolls-house/comment-page-1/#comment-4611 Thu, 17 Jun 2010 12:20:20 +0000 http://whiteperil.com/?p=2790#comment-4611 Sally Quinn is a silly woman. Me thinks she’s a bit obsessed with her own tag-along to a “great” man meme. I hear she’s religious to boot.

As for school districts cheating on tests, I do not agree with that kind of thing, of course, but I’m not really surprised by it because my experience has led me to believe that it’s not the schools per se that are the underlying cause of poor test scores (at least not where I live in Durham, NC, a district filled with Title I kids). It’s the populations they serve. I have a 14-year-old I’m helping to raise with my former partner, and she’s been in public school her whole life and has thrived in it, not just socially but educationwise. It’s because it’s expected of her. There are no familial expectations for most poor-achieving kids, only pity offered by teachers in the name of self-esteem. Grownups no longer rule as they once did, and the schools are charged to serve all kids. There’s very little exercise during the school day (and we wonder why some boys cannot sit still in their seats). Meanwhile, right down the road in Chapel Hill, a town full of professional children, test scores are one of the highest, if not the highest, in the state. People act amazed by this. They can’t figure it out. Mindboggling.

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